Clipped Planchet

To mint coins strips of metal are passed through machinery which strike these strips to
produce blank planchets.  These planchets later after being struck by die's and leaving
the intended imprint become coins.  A clipped planchet occurs when a stip is miss-fed
through the machinery.  When the strip isn't fed far enough along and the punches
come down to punch out the circular planchet they actually strike an area of the strip
which overlaps the hole left by the previous strike. This then leaves a planchet which is
of irregular shape.  If this planchet makes it to the dies and is struck the end result is a
coin that appears to have a circular clip to it.  Many people falsely believe this error
occurs during the die striking period.
1922 Shilling Clipped Planchet
Courtesy of Rob Pearce
www.rpcoins.co.uk
1999 Twopence Clipped Planchet
Hus Sulo Collection
The Blakesley effect is named for the American numismatist who first described it.
The Blakesley effect occurs on most genuine clipped planchet error coins and is
characterised by  weakness in the rim opposite the clipped end of the coin.
Blakesley Effect
Hus Sulo Collection
Straight Clip Error

A straight clip error takes place when the planchet for a coin is stamped from an end of a
roll of metal being used.  There for you end up with a blank planchet with a straight edge
to it. When this planchet is then stamped with the details of the coin you are left with a
coin which has a straight clip error. This can take place when the timing on the machine
feeding the roll of metal and the machine stamping the planchets are slightly out.

I have drawn a picture at the bottom of the page to illustrate what I mean.

You can usually tell if this kind of error is one which is a genuine mint error or one which is
a post mint fake error by looking at the clip.

On a real error you would expect to see the detail nearest the clip to fade away. On a fake
it would just come to a sudden end. If you look closely at the picture especially the rim,
beading and the letters closes to the edge you can see the detail fading. This would not
happen if the coin was to be a post mint error and on one which has been cut.

Another way to tell if the coin is a genuine straight clip error is to examine the clipped end.
On a genuine error the clipped end of the planchet will be thinner then the opposite
unclipped end. This takes place when the details of the coin are stamped onto the
planchet. Because there is a gap and the collar is not touching the gap some of the metal
in the coin flows outward in the direction of the missing part of the coin, so it ends up
being slightly thinner on that end.
Hus Sulo Collection
GEORGE IV
GEORGE III
GEORGE II
GEORGE I
ANNE
WILLIAM III
WILLIAM & MARY
VICTORIA
EDWARD VII
ERROR COINS
GEORGE V
GEORGE VI
WILLIAM IV
EDWARD VIII
GRADING COINS
PRICE GUIDE
CROMWELL
JAMES II
CHARLES II
HOME PAGE